Arkansas

 

NTSV Cesarean Birth Rate Dashboard: Arkansas

The Healthy People 2020 target of 23.9% not yet met.

After a dramatic drop in 2014, preliminary 2017 data show that Arkansas' NTSV cesarean rate is climbing upward instead of heading closer to the Healthy People 2020 target of 23.9 percent.   

What does NTSV mean?

How does Arkansas compare to the United States?

How does Arkansas rank among other states?

 

About this state dashboard

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics provided a special report on state-level final data only published by CDC at the national level to CesareanRates.org. These include numbers of some maternal morbidity cases as well as characteristics of labor and delivery not currently accessible in CDC WONDER. Our organization is publishing these alongside national numbers to inform the public, policy makers, public health experts and the obstetric and midwifery community about state-level progress toward Healthy People 2020 goals for childbirth.

 

 
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Defined by the World Health Organization Maternal Morbidity Working Group (MMWG), 2013. 

 
 
 

Maternal Morbidity, Arkansas, 2016

All births: 38,274

Maternal transfusion: 21

3rd- or 4th-degree perineal laceration: 24

Ruptured uterus: 0

Unplanned hysterectomy: 2

Admission to intensive care unit: 2

Unknown: 3

Maternal Morbidity, United States, 2016

All births: 3,945,875

Maternal transfusion: 11,494

3rd- or 4th-degree perineal laceration: 25,463

Ruptured uterus: 976

Unplanned hysterectomy: 1,342

Admission to intensive care unit: 5,003

Unknown: 5,362

 

More on CDC WONDER.


Characteristics of Labor and Delivery

 

Final Route of Delivery, Arkansas

Overall cesarean rate in 2016: 32.3 percent

Final Route of Delivery, United States

Overall cesarean rate in 2016: 31.9 percent
 

VBAC v. Repeat Cesarean, Arkansas

6.5 percent Vaginal Birth After Cesarean rate (excludes unknown)

VBAC v. Repeat Cesarean, U.S.

12.4 percent Vaginal Birth After Cesarean rate (excludes unknown)

Compare Arkansas to other states:

 

Births to Women with a Prior C-section, Arkansas

15.2 percent

Births to Women with a Prior C-section, United States

15.3 percent
 

Epidural/Spinal Utilization, Arkansas

71.5 percent

Epidural/Spinal Utilization, United States

73.5 percent
 

Cesarean with Trial of Labor, Arkansas

29.6 percent attempted a trial of labor before a cesarean birth (excludes unknown).

Cesarean with Trial of Labor, United States

25.3 percent attempted a trial of labor before a cesarean birth (excludes unknown).
 

Induction of Labor, Arkansas

27.2 percent

Induction of Labor, United States

24.5 percent
 

Labor Augmentation, Arkansas

18.2 percent

Labor Augmentation, United States

21.0 percent

Regionalization of Maternal Care

 

Perinatal regionalization of care has been goal for decades and focused primarily on the newborn. In 2015, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine published an Obstetric Care Consensus document on Levels of Maternal Care to formalize facility standards for maternal care.

CDC supports a Levels of Care Assessment tool called LOCATe to assist in standardizing voluntary regional assessment and designation of levels of care and to create a "starting point for discussions about how states can improve health outcomes for women and infants."

American Hospital Association requires that all surveyed hospitals designate the level of obstetric care of services owned or provided by the hospital as Level 1, 2 or 3. Unlike the Levels of Maternal Care standards, AHA does not include any non-hospital birth centers, as it only surveys hospitals. AHA defines these levels as follows:

(1) unit provides services for uncomplicated maternity and newborn cases;

(2) unit provides services for uncomplicated cases, the majority of complicated problems, and special neonatal services; and

(3) unit provides services for all serious illnesses and abnormalities and is supervised by a full-time maternal/fetal specialist.

 

Total Births per OB Level of Care (1, 2 or 3), Arkansas

Level 1: 14.6% (12 hospitals) | Level 2: 53.6% (16 hospitals) | Level 3: 28.4% (6 hospitals) | 3.4% no level reported (3 hospitals). Only hospitals with 30 or more births included. 2016 data.

Total Births per OB Level of Care (1, 2 or 3), United States

Level 1: 13.5% | Level 2: 31.9% | Level 3: 43.9% | Unknown: 10.7%. Only hospitals with 30 or more births included. 2016 data.
 

Tools for Promoting Maternal Safety

 

Several organizations offer free quality improvement solutions online, including condition-specific toolkits and larger scale data collection and analysis protocols.

 

Hospital level:

Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care: Maternal Safety Bundles

California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative: Toolkits and Maternal Data Center

Patient Safety Movement Foundation: Optimizing Obstetric Safety Actionable Patient Safety Solutions (APSS)

 

State or regional level:

State Perinatal Quality Collaboratives

Maternal Mortality Review Committees: General information and standardization of data collection

 

We would greatly appreciate feedback on this page. What additional resources and action steps would be most helpful in moving the patient safety needle? 

 
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